Where The Wild Things Float

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       My time in Burkina Faso, with the indigenous people has taught me that our differences are what make us so similar and connected. We share the same views, same aspirations and the same sensations. But our external actions are what may confuse us to think us as apart, different and dissimilar.

       What we all are and love holds no boundaries between where and who we would like to be. Circumstances and fate brought about by our choices and in their case, lack of (the proper) knowledge has forged a flexibly iron path of both parties. Leading each party to first melt this iron path and mould again one that brings them more progress and sustainable change. But in their case I am left with the question of “what can they use to melt this iron path?”” Who will/is willing to teach them correctly and boldly to go about it this way with these tools-in their setting?”” When will they finally let go and become better than what they are and image to be?”And, “how do they think they should arrive there as oppose to what we outsiders looking in think?”

        These are questions I have limited answers to but still think it at least answers half of the questions in a deeper more humbling way; which is the passionate service of a volunteer. Someone willing to come low to their level, dine as they do and starve with them if need be. A volunteer who will understand that the differences he or she shares with the village are only similarities waiting to be explored and not isolated. A volunteer will take those forsaken moments into a learning period and push harder to the end of service because he or she knows when it gets that tough it means he or she is doing something life changing and not necessarily wrong. A person who will carry them, especially when they want to fall willingly out of fear for change.  And finally a person, a volunteer who will remember that his or her presence will forever make a significant change in a least one life- and that is all that matters: changing one a time-however long it will take.

      I have come to believe that this volunteer, this Peace Corps volunteer is one who can embark on such a journey but only with true rekindling passion and a purpose in their heart.

~Celestina Agyekum

Filed under Peace Corps volunteer Burkina Faso

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Best thing I've read on tumblr.

Professor :
You are a Christian, aren’t you, son?
Student :
Yes, sir.
Professor:
So, you believe in GOD?
Student :
Absolutely, sir.
Professor :
Is GOD good?
Student :
Sure.
Professor:
Is GOD all powerful?
Student :
Yes.
Professor:
My brother died of cancer even though he prayed to GOD to heal him. Most of us would attempt to help others who are ill. But GOD didn’t. How is this GOD good then? Hmm?
(Student was silent.)
Professor:
You can’t answer, can you ? Let’s start again, young fella. Is GOD good?
Student :
Yes.
Professor:
Is satan good?
Student :
No.
Professor:
Where does satan come from?
Student :
From … GOD …
Professor:
That’s right. Tell me son, is there evil in this world?
Student :
Yes.
Professor:
Evil is everywhere, isn’t it ? And GOD did make everything. Correct?
Student :
Yes
Professor:
So who created evil ?
(Student did not answer.)
Professor:
Is there sickness? Immorality? Hatred? Ugliness? All these terrible things exist in the world, don’t they?
Student :
Yes, sir.
Professor:
So, who created them ?
(Student had no answer.)
Professor:
Science says you have 5 Senses you use to identify and observe the world around you. Tell me, son, have you ever seen GOD?
Student :
No, sir.
Professor:
Tell us if you have ever heard your GOD?
Student :
No , sir.
Professor:
Have you ever felt your GOD, tasted your GOD, smell your GOD? Have you ever had any sensory perception of GOD for that matter?
Student :
No, sir. I’m afraid I haven’t.
Professor:
Yet you still believe in Him?
Student :
Yes.
Professor :
According to Empirical, Testable, Demonstrable Protocol, Science says your GOD doesn’t exist. What do you say to that, son?
Student :
Nothing. I only have my faith.
Professor:
Yes, faith. And that is the problem Science has.
Student :
Professor, is there such a thing as heat?
Professor:
Yes.
Student :
And is there such a thing as cold?
Professor:
Yes.
Student :
No, sir. There isn’t.
(The lecture theatre became very quiet with this turn of events.)
Student :
Sir, you can have lots of heat, even more heat, superheat, mega heat, white heat, a little heat or no heat. But we don’t have anything called cold. We can hit 458 degrees below zero which is no heat, but we can’t go any further after that. There is no such thing as cold. Cold is only a word we use to describe the absence of heat. We cannot measure cold. Heat is energy. Cold is not the opposite of heat, sir, just the absence of it.
(There was pin-drop silence in the lecture theater.)
Student :
What about darkness, Professor? Is there such a thing as darkness?
Professor:
Yes. What is night if there isn’t darkness?
Student :
You’re wrong again, sir. Darkness is the absence of something. You can have low light, normal light, bright light, flashing light. But if you have no light constantly, you have nothing and its called darkness, isn’t it? In reality, darkness isn’t. If it is, were you would be able to make darkness darker, wouldn’t you?
Professor:
So what is the point you are making, young man?
Student :
Sir, my point is your philosophical premise is flawed.
Professor:
Flawed ? Can you explain how?
Student :
Sir, you are working on the premise of duality. You argue there is life and then there is death, a good GOD and a bad GOD. You are viewing the concept of GOD as something finite, something we can measure. Sir, Science can’t even explain a thought. It uses electricity and magnetism, but has never seen, much less fully understood either one. To view death as the opposite of life is to be ignorant of the fact that death cannot exist as a substantive thing. Death is not the opposite of life: just the absence of it. Now tell me, Professor, do you teach your students that they evolved from a monkey?
Professor:
If you are referring to the natural evolutionary process, yes, of course, I do.
Student :
Have you ever observed evolution with your own eyes, sir?
(The Professor shook his head with a smile, beginning to realize where the argument was going.)
Student :
Since no one has ever observed the process of evolution at work and cannot even prove that this process is an on-going endeavor. Are you not teaching your opinion, sir? Are you not a scientist but a preacher?
(The class was in uproar.)
Student :
Is there anyone in the class who has ever seen the Professor’s brain?
(The class broke out into laughter.)
Student :
Is there anyone here who has ever heard the Professor’s brain, felt it, touched or smelt it? No one appears to have done so. So, according to the established Rules of Empirical, Stable, Demonstrable Protocol, Science says that you have no brain, sir. With all due respect, sir, how do we then trust your lectures, sir?
(The room was silent. The Professor stared at the student, his face unfathomable.)
Professor:
I guess you’ll have to take them on faith, son.
Student :
That is it sir… Exactly ! The link between man and GOD is FAITH. That is all that keeps things alive and moving.
That student was Albert Einstein.
REBLOG BECAUSE REASONS.

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africaisdonesuffering:

The Chinese Can’t Solve Africa’s Issues
One day my co-worker and I were taking the 5-hour trek to Mwanza Tanzania. We passed by a long stretch of roads being paved; the usual infrastructure projects popping up across the back roads of Africa. What was hysterical to see were the Chinese men along the route, decked out in floppy hats, gloves, and long sleeved shirts, burning up in the heat, screaming orders to their Tanzanian workers through a loud speaker. I laughed because they looked damn ridiculous, but my coworker nodded his head in approval saying, “The Chinese are doing good work! They will lead Tanzania into a good future. No more need for white people!” Now, what is sadder about this? The fact that he defines innovation and development solely based upon infrastructure projects, or the fact that this thinking will leave one to believe that groups like the Chinese are leading innovation on our continent? For me, a [self-proclaimed] gender and development professional, innovation is not always linked to infrastructure projects or grandiose architectural displays of “Westernization.” Innovation is far beyond Middle Easterners and Asians controlling our cities’ landscapes with their version of architecture and what is good and “creative.” For me innovation must be young Africans using our insight to solve crucial social problems; issues like poor health services, debilitating political corruption, or lackluster institutions of higher learning, must be attacked in our generation.
Innovation can be taking a social problem within the context of our respective countries and looking for sustainable solutions. Therefore innovation can be realizing that there are no medical evacuation mechanisms in all of West Africa, and that people die everyday in this region because they cannot reach proper medical facilities in time. Innovation is what 25-year-old Dr. Ola Orekunrin displayed when she started Flying Doctors Nigeria. After her 11 year old sister fell ill in Nigeria and her family realized that the nearest air ambulance facility was located in South Africa, Dr. Orekunrin worked and fought to break down bureaucratic doors and naysayers to develop West Africa’s first and only air ambulance service. She has shone light on the fact that quality emergency care services are few and far between on our continent and we can be the ones to address that discrepancy. Innovation can also be finding ways to tackle corruption and lack of transparency in our countries. Take Ory Okolloh, a Kenyan-born Harvard educated lawyer, who created the blog Mzalendo. It is a website which provides an unprecedented look at the work of Kenya’s parliament, attempting to make accessible to the public information on the voting patterns and governmental activity of their parliamentary leaders. This is information that was previously unavailable to Kenyan citizens but is now online and accessible to citizens. Now, is this the answer for Kenya or other countries? Maybe not, but it’s getting people talking, it’s spotlighting the fact that we actually may not know what our “elected” officials are up to, and it’s making officials accountable for funds raised and used, and activities approved.
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africaisdonesuffering:

The Chinese Can’t Solve Africa’s Issues

One day my co-worker and I were taking the 5-hour trek to Mwanza Tanzania. We passed by a long stretch of roads being paved; the usual infrastructure projects popping up across the back roads of Africa. What was hysterical to see were the Chinese men along the route, decked out in floppy hats, gloves, and long sleeved shirts, burning up in the heat, screaming orders to their Tanzanian workers through a loud speaker. I laughed because they looked damn ridiculous, but my coworker nodded his head in approval saying, “The Chinese are doing good work! They will lead Tanzania into a good future. No more need for white people!” Now, what is sadder about this? The fact that he defines innovation and development solely based upon infrastructure projects, or the fact that this thinking will leave one to believe that groups like the Chinese are leading innovation on our continent? For me, a [self-proclaimed] gender and development professional, innovation is not always linked to infrastructure projects or grandiose architectural displays of “Westernization.” Innovation is far beyond Middle Easterners and Asians controlling our cities’ landscapes with their version of architecture and what is good and “creative.” For me innovation must be young Africans using our insight to solve crucial social problems; issues like poor health services, debilitating political corruption, or lackluster institutions of higher learning, must be attacked in our generation.

Innovation can be taking a social problem within the context of our respective countries and looking for sustainable solutions. Therefore innovation can be realizing that there are no medical evacuation mechanisms in all of West Africa, and that people die everyday in this region because they cannot reach proper medical facilities in time. Innovation is what 25-year-old Dr. Ola Orekunrin displayed when she started Flying Doctors Nigeria. After her 11 year old sister fell ill in Nigeria and her family realized that the nearest air ambulance facility was located in South Africa, Dr. Orekunrin worked and fought to break down bureaucratic doors and naysayers to develop West Africa’s first and only air ambulance service. She has shone light on the fact that quality emergency care services are few and far between on our continent and we can be the ones to address that discrepancy. Innovation can also be finding ways to tackle corruption and lack of transparency in our countries. Take Ory Okolloh, a Kenyan-born Harvard educated lawyer, who created the blog Mzalendo. It is a website which provides an unprecedented look at the work of Kenya’s parliament, attempting to make accessible to the public information on the voting patterns and governmental activity of their parliamentary leaders. This is information that was previously unavailable to Kenyan citizens but is now online and accessible to citizens. Now, is this the answer for Kenya or other countries? Maybe not, but it’s getting people talking, it’s spotlighting the fact that we actually may not know what our “elected” officials are up to, and it’s making officials accountable for funds raised and used, and activities approved.

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(via prepaidafrica)

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Work it

It is when you are on the ground like I am, doing the work from the grass roots that you realize that you need to push prayer a little to the side and replace that space with tangible work. Actions at this point become essential just as prayer and one absolutely cannot go without the other. After all the bible talks about helping each other and not just pray about their problems and ours. We have been given the mind and wisdom to solve the problems so why still cry about it in prayer hoping for a miracle-you are he miracle so put yourself to work!

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Anonymous asked: What inspired you to blog. your writing is excellent. you provoke thoughts that satisfy. Keep the gd work

hi anonymous :)

i am inspired to write by what moves me which usually leads me to share because I hate to have all that insight to myself. Thank you so much for the feedback- it’s a boost!

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Nomad

There comes a time when we wake up from our fantasies, our prolonged daydreaming. Where we fall harder into our reality and unfortunate facts of our lives. Where the truth is not coloured in black and white or grey but is just one colour: solid with no shades.
Such moments remind me of how far i have to go to correct the unfortunate ideas I was born into and constantly reminded of -with or without my permission. And since i cant change the situation, i must change my attitude toward it. Adapting every single minute, reformulating every hour and recreating each second. What do I owe myself in this world that sees my skin first and every other thing second and almost insignificant is the question I ask. No place is home so i keep moving from country to continent, and in each place there is never enough acceptance.

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Aside from the air we breath freely and fight over how and who gives it, what else is there to always hope and pray we have?for without it we cannot express our deepest feelings to one another, or say the things no one else can say better than us. And even with this gift of breath we repeatedly fail to regard the slightest priceless moments. Will we wait till our breath has been or nearly been taken away before we realise this or will we live now like its our alter most last? And say the things than need saying? Stand up for those who just cannot and act upon the things that causes progressive change? There is nothing like “later” or “tomorrow” only what if…and that can either be a rewarding what if or it’s opposite.

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ofoesaysit:

Ghana, My Home - Africa
Bride’s Maid ben prepared traditionally in Ghana, Dzodze Volta Region.
Beads, Ewe Kente and gold are used to make a beautiful maid.
Never forget the culture
Photography by Ofoe Amegavie, 2014

ofoesaysit:

Ghana, My Home - Africa

Bride’s Maid ben prepared traditionally in Ghana, Dzodze Volta Region.

Beads, Ewe Kente and gold are used to make a beautiful maid.

Never forget the culture

Photography by Ofoe Amegavie, 2014

(via iandafrica)

0 notes

I have come to understand the reasons for things and people being the way they are, acting the way they do; for events happening the way they do and the reactions that inherit them. I do not entirely, if at all, agree with some of it but I understand it enough to leave it alone and not spoil it’s course with my meddling.
You see life has its way of reminding us of our beliefs and the reasons we chose such beliefs. It is our choice then to keep the old strict and rigid beliefs handed down from the ones who preceded us or to acknowledge its change and amendments with the fast and growing world we exist in.
It does not mean I have conformed or forgotten my identity it only means I have altered, changed, enhanced,evolved and co-existed if you will; and that to me reflects my growth and rebirths- an endless, complicated and essential cycle to experience in ones life.